Spiritual Zen

It’s the moment we dread—the time when the big doctor looks glum and proclaims that you have only a limited time to live.  Of course, you may or may not ever experience that moment.  However, it is quite common to have an epiphany.  That moment in which an inner voice calls to say and asks you, “What would you do with your life if today (or this year) were all that you had left?”

Isn’t it the same to say that you would change your approach to life?  Your daily routines would change, and perhaps your entire perspective would quickly be reimagined.  Unfortunately for most of humanity, the only time we ever think about life is when we think about death.  We spend most of our time zoning out, filling our schedule with work, with daily routines and all sorts of inane projects that seem very important at the time, and yet seem rather dank and trivial when we think about the meaning of life.

While the meaning of life is fairly complex, what we want to stress in this particular article is the idea of having no regrets.  Life lived to its fullest, without any regrets, is truly the answer to your life.  The whole “life or death question” is beneficial to us because it helps us to narrow focus and see life as it is right now, rather than what your life is going to be like tomorrow, or next year or 20 years from now.

It may help to meditate on this question (for a long while) and listen to your inner voice.  What do you want to do with your life?  If money were not an option, how would you spend your time?  Many people find that after getting all the moments of self-gratification out of their system (sex, money, gluttony, adrenaline rushes, etc.) that they feel empty inside.  They have experienced pleasure but not truly embraced the spiritual aspect of life.

In the case of most people, the spiritual meaning to life is not self-contained.  It is what you do for others.  It is based upon your ability to use talents and resources to help others, while making yourself feel good.  This is what truly makes you feel alive and “completes you” as a human being.

In the movie “Into the Wild” based upon a book by Christopher McCandless, the title character expresses life’s meaning very well: Happiness is only real when shared.  Indeed, amassing things for yourself, oblivious to the rest of humankind is vanity.  Your true spiritual purpose—whatever it is—is your contribution to the human race.  Go and find it…and live each day as if it were your last.